Discover the Labyrinth at Adams Farm

The entrance to the labyrinth at Adams Farm

The entrance to the labyrinth at Adams Farm

Take a walk in the woods and discover the labyrinth at Adams Farm!  A labyrinth is a meditative tool used for contemplative walking that consists of a long path that continuously doubles back on itself, bordered by stones, low hedges or walls. However, unlike a maze where you might lose your way, a labyrinth helps you find your way.

The labyrinth at Adams Farm is located near the start of the Blue/White Trail, a 10-minute walk from the barn.  Follow the main Blue Trail into the woods until you spot the trailhead of the Blue/White Trail on your right with a sign for the labyrinth underneath.

A sign at the start of the Blue/White Trail points to the labyrinth.

A sign at the start of the Blue/White Trail points to the labyrinth.

Turn onto the Blue/White Trail and soon you’ll see a rustic carved wooden sign labyrinth sign on your left and the labyrinth on your right, tucked into a clearing in the woods.

A carved wooden sign near the entrance to the labyrinth

A carved wooden sign near the entrance to the labyrinth

The labyrinth was the brainchild of Jessica Lastarza, a FOAF board member interested in meditation.  Jessica invited Sandy Cardinal, a labyrinth designer from western MA, to visit Adams Farm to take a look at the site in the woods that FOAF had chosen for the labyrinth.  The goal was to create an inconspicuous labyrinth made of natural materials that would blend in with the setting and be easy to maintain.

The paths of the labyrinth begin to take shape.

Working with the exact dimensions of the space, Sandy designed a 5-circuit labyrinth that fit the site perfectly.  Volunteers returned to the site later to rake the paths of the labyrinth and line the walls with small rocks.

Come check out the labyrinth at Adams Farm and feel free to bring along a rock or two of your own to add to the walls!

Rocks line the walls of the finished labyrinth.

Rocks line the walls of the finished labyrinth.

(For those interested in walking a larger labyrinth, visit Sandy Cardinal’s Johnson Hill Farm in Buckland, MA.  There she has created an 11-circuit labyrinth on a gently sloping hillside featuring many types of lavender, herbs, wildflowers, field grasses and ferns, open to the public by appointment.  Find out more at www.farmfresh.org/food/farm.php?farm=1787.)